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Want to know what media renovation looks like?

The talk about media innovation is common. Media need to change or die. Even hard core journalists accept this as fact.

It is a rare week when I don’t hear from a frustrated member of the media looking to leave the uncertainty and struggles gripping journalists as they seek the right combination to right their ship.

But what does “right” look like? Up front and personal? Is it as much innovation as renovation and rejuvenation? After all, media veterans know how to create the information the public hungers to read, view, listen to and interact with.

James. R. Gaines wrote about his personal rejuvenation in a New York Times article titled, “Over 60, And Proud To Join The Digerati.”

Gaines writes about his transition from a top editor at Time, Life and People magazines to his role as journalism mentor at an online publication called FLYP, a pretty cool multimedia magazine.

Listen in: “FLYP’s founder, Alan Stoga, is several years younger than I am. The other people on the staff are decades younger than either of us. Most of them, I suspect, have body piercings or tattoos of some sort. You can say 60 is the new 40 all you want. Where I work, even 40 is pretty old.”

Gaines relates his growing pains and adjustments, but comes to a promising conclusion.

“Yes, the world of print publishing is going through a fundamental distruption brought about by the Internet. People are being laid off left and right, newspapers and magazines are folding, the book business is floundering.

“In the digital world, though, social networks are now bigger than most national populations, more people are consuming more news and information than ever before, and an archive of all the world’s knowledge is being built and streamed to your favorite device. This new world brings with it as much promise as pain. It’s like youth that way.”

Innovation. Renovation. Rejuvenation. Something to look forward to, I hope.

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