Entrepreneurs are attracting media like never before

The Time magazine cover was compelling. People were standing on a white cover in the form of letters spelling “JOBS” The headline continued, “Where They Are And How to Find Them.”

The Fortune redesign caught my eye. Managing Editor Andy Serwer explained the magazine would continue to produce in-depth articles, but it was adding more news their readers could use. “How to manage their careers – including ways to think more entrepreneurially – in and outside of large companies.” Much of this news will now appear in two new sections in Fortune called Careers and Venture.

As the nation tentatively feels its way out of recession, the media increasingly are trying to cover the story, from the macro-perspective of national trends to the micro-consumer news. Information on how companies can “think more entrepreneurially” is becoming increasingly valuable, along with the articles on how small businesses can compete globally without adding staff, and how those who lost their jobs can transition into a new career.

There is a great deal of media attention being paid to these topics. Along with Time and Fortune,  monitor the Wall Street Journal’s small business coverage. Reporter Sarah Needleman recently moved to the team, after a stint covering career issues.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s small business channel is filled with news entrepreneurs can use, as is Inc magazine. has a small business channel, including a section page called “Innovation Nation.”

Forbes magazine prides itself on its coverage of entrepreneurs and small business. It’s Boost Your Business contest is highly regarded.

The careers and small business coverage used to be relegated to the back of the media bus, but no more. An increasing portion of the nation is involved in career change and entrepreneurial activity, including big businesses adopting the best practices of entrepreneurial innovation. The media are noticing, a facilitating the trend with additional information.

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