China Touts Wind-Worthiness

My previous post about last week’s WINDPOWER 2010 show in Dallas highlighted the advanced energy enthusiasm in and for Northeast Ohio. It is very real and great to see the current energy and positive long-term outlook.

There were other geographies for sure that captured the attention of attendees and exhibitors.  In fact, more than a dozen states and several ports, cities, provinces and countries were on hand to tout their wind-worthiness. According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), 36 states now have wind energy projects.

The host state of Texas is number one in installed wind turbine capacity – and its supporters made sure everyone knew about it. Iowa, with 78 wind farms, currently ranks second and is accelerating its progress – and not giving up on its dream to be number one.

Europe is always well represented, but the overwhelming impression was provided by the large and growing Asian presence at the show. Of the more than 1,300 exhibitors, well over 100 were Asia-based organizations, coming from the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Korea and India, and covering virtually every part of the wind energy industry value chain. There were more than 40 organizations from China alone, plus dozens of multinationals whose wind strategy is directly linked to their China strategy.

One Chinese company, Mingyang Wind Power Industry Group Co., Ltd., which describes itself as the third-largest wind energy company in China, made a splash by announcing the opening of its U.S. operations based in Dallas. The wind turbine manufacturer is starting with an office but plans to build and operate manufacturing centers in the U.S., most likely starting in Dallas. The company aims to become the world’s most affordable provider of wind energy services.

In any language, the message was clear: Global competition in wind energy is becoming fierce, and China, relative newcomer status aside, is right in the middle of that competition.

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